The evolution of barcode label printing software

How Did Barcode Label Printing Software Evolve Over Years?

Labels are the heart and soul of any business. Every industry, ranging from electronics, furniture, food, and even groceries, makes use of multiple labels every single day. It presents the product of any business and has the power to convert a window shopper into your customer.

 

In the present era, businesses have huge manufacturing units set up that utilize barcode label printing software to fulfill their needs related to labeling. But have you ever wondered how the picture looked in life when there was no technology in place to implement this crucial task in a business?

 

So sit back tight! In this article, we are going to trace the evolution of label making and printing in the past to what it looks like in the present era.

 

The First Evidence of the Existence of Labels

 

The history of labels dates back thousands of years. With the production of various kinds of products, the need for product identification and information arose.

 

The last credible source of the label’s origin goes back to 6000 years ago when wine was produced. It was the favorite wine of King Tutankhamun, who died in 1352 BC, and was found buried with him. It came as a matter of surprise that the wine container had inscribed information about the type of wine, the year it was made, where it was made and who made it. It was technically classed as a label.

 

There are many credible examples throughout our history that justify those labels were used thousands of years ago.

 

Labels in the 1700s and Further

 

It was in the 1700s that the first known label appeared, being used on medical containers. It was made of handmade paper with information printed on it by a wooden press and glued to the product.

 

The earliest signs of these labels before the introduction of label maker software were common for drugs and medicines. However, things changed in the 1800s when the printing process evolved. It was based on the concept that oil and water do not mix. But it came as an expensive affair. Businesses would often use the same label for a few years and often placed bulk orders to save themselves from burning a hole in their pockets.

 

Adhesive Labels: The First Time Technology Revolutionized Labeling

 

It was back in the 1930s when the great R. Stanton Avery introduced the world to the very first self-adhesive label. It was the start of the change in the label manufacturing industry.

 

He invented labels that had a coat of adhesive and a silicon liner on a paper surface. It was also known as the sticker that could be stuck directly to a product. And its usage went up on a mass scale and is now worth billions in the present era.

 

Factcheck: You would be astonished to know that Avery’s company is still running to this day, and according to reports, the net worth of Avery Dennison is in the region of 17 billion.

 

Label Maker Software: the Next Big Thing in the Label Manufacturing Industry

 

Technology leaves no stone unturned to astonish the world with its wonders. After the invention of computers, it opened the door to better printers. It offered the convenience of printing labels at home that were quite easy on the pocket.

 

Inkjet printers, dot matrix printers, laser printers, and others were some of the common tools that first arrived on the market. As of today, with newer technologies on board, we have barcode label printing software with us that allows you to create, design, generate, and automate labels for your business. It has invited flexibility and accuracy in the everyday operation of labels.

 

Are You Using the Barcode Printing Software? It’s High Time You Get It

 

If you are still hustling with everyday label-making and printing operations, consider it a sign that you need to upgrade your technology. We have a great recommendation for you to start with that would solve all your problems with one solution. Connect now and we would be happy to assist you with our label printing software solutions.

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